The Wicked Green: How Mushrooms Will Save The World

By Emma Brown
Creative Marketing at Bootstrap Compost, Inc.

Whatever your culinary preferences are regarding mushrooms, it turns out that there are some seriously green uses with fungi outside of the kitchen. Indeed, there are good, hardworking folks throughout the world concocting unique ideas and products with mushrooms that may just help save the planet.

Back in February, I found out about Coeio, a company that produces the Infinity Burial Suit. What’s so special about it? It’s completely biodegradable and made from mushrooms and other microorganisms. Bodies buried in the suits eventually break down and aid the earth. Heck, they even make suits for pets to be buried in! You can read more about the Infinity Suit over at Grist.

As beautiful as some caskets may be, they also act to slow the process of decomposition. Thus, each and every body that is buried in a casket acts more like a personalized underground landfill rather than a compost pile that returns the body back to the earth. Couple this with the fact that populations continue to rise and age, solutions for alternative burials will become increasingly important over the coming decades.

Humans are one thing, but what about all that pesky plastic we are creating and throwing away? Plastic can survive over 150 years in a landfill- that’s bad news for Mother Earth. But it turns out that mushrooms can help us tackle that issue, too. We’ve known since 2012 that fungi can break down plastic, but no one has really figured out a great way to harness that power and use it to our advantage – until now. A joint effort between Livin Studio and Utrecht University led to the development of the Fungi Mutarium, which not only breaks down plastic, but leaves an edible product in its wake!

It works like this: pods of agar (an algae-based type of gelatin) are loaded up with plastic waste and fungi, which feeds on the waste and leaves a puffy mushroom-like food product within a few weeks. The plastic is completely broken down and not incorporated into the fungal matter so the end product is non-toxic and 100% edible for human consumption. These pods might be hard to come by today, but with more funding and research, we could all have plastic-fighting fungi in our kitchens in a few short years.

Whew! Like wild mushrooms in a damp forest, we covered a lot of ground here. Please feel free to add comments, questions, concerns, tiny hair-like fibers, your opinions on mushrooms, and other thoughts in the comment section below. Happy digesting!

Also, the human body consists of more bacterial cells (~39 trillion) than actual human cells (~30 trillion).

 

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