The BiG Stink: Eating by the Bucket

By Faith Miller
Operations Manager at Bootstrap Compost, Inc.

Let’s debut “The Big Stink” with something we all do quite often: eating. This everyday activity has been plagued by the endless health claims of fad diets, “superfoods”, and public health misfires. Eggs are evil cholesterol orbs. Acai berries for life. Fats are bad; nevermind, only some fats are bad. This continued intellectual food fight has resulted in a confused public (and I’ll bet some gross meals too).

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“Eat Food. Not too much. Mostly Plants.” -Michael Pollan

Two very different voices have ushered in Round 2016 of the food fight. The first contender stepping into the (onion?) ring was Dietary Guidelines for Americans jointly published every five years by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and Department of Agriculture (USDA). The guidelines are the basis for school lunches, dietitian recommendations, and food labels. They are jam packed with statistics, infographs, and incredibly specific recommendations.There’s also an exhaustive table listing acceptable consumption of macronutrients, minerals, and vitamins. This is all great information, but it wasn’t meant for average Joe to use as a handbook for healthy eating. The Guidelines were created for professionals to advise patients to consume a healthy diet. The message was clear: Johnny Public needs a doctor to tell him what to eat.

A very different message was proclaimed by author and delicious food activist Michael Pollan. In December of 2015 the PBS documentary “In Defense of Food” aired. The documentary, based on Pollan’s 2008 book of the same title, answered the question: What should I eat to be healthy? While the government’s Guidelines relied on a barrage of information filtered through professionals to solve the riddle, Pollan’s entire message was summarized in 7 words- Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants. Boom (well, that last one’s not part of it).

“If it’s a plant, eat it. If it’s made in a plant, don’t.”
– Michael Pollan

Food, Pollan contends, is not the packaged monstrosities found in the center aisles of one’s local grocery. Those things packed with hydrogenated oils, high fructose corn michael pollansyrup, and wrapped in plastic are factory creations, not delicious healthy food. Food is all
the things found around the outside aisles of that same store such as vegetables, dairy products, meats, and fruit. “If it’s a plant, eat it. If it was made in a plant, don’t.” The information Pollan presented is the same found in the Guidelines. He just put an engaging bow on it and added a call to action: Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants.

I don’t want to infringe on Pollan’s genius, but I’m gonna put out my own call to action: Eat by the bucket. I’m not suggesting you eat with a bucket at your side or use the bucket for measuring portions. I mean eat things that can go in the BSC bucket. If it grows it goes and everything Pollan and the Guidelines define as healthy food can be tossed in your bucket and composted (minus meat and dairy!). So here’s the unofficial BSC guide to healthy eating: If it’s good for the bucket, it’s good for you. And that’s a food fight knockout.

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